Mentoring

June 17, 2015

Fatherhood on The Find A Way to Make A Way Show

On the next episode of The “FIND A WAY to MAKE A WAY” Show, in honor of Fathers Day, HaroldRead more →

November 20, 2014

Holiday Sales Break

SYNOPSIS Just in time for the holiday, FROM FATHERLESS TO FATHERHOOD is a documentary film that explores the causes, effectsRead more →

November 4, 2014

Watch: Newark’s Own, Dupre’ Kelly, Pus …

He’s not a schoolteacher, nor has he ever been. But some of life’s most important lessons are taught outside ofRead more →

August 28, 2014

DeVon Franklin Celebrates His Biggest Mentors

“The movie of your life is only as successful as the people who you allow to play roles in it”Read more →

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Fatherhood on The Find A Way to Make A Way Show

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On the next episode of The “FIND A WAY to MAKE A WAY” Show, in honor of Fathers Day, Harold S. Reed, Jr. dedicates the show to discussing what it is to be a father. The lines will be open for fathers to call in and share their insights and advice and for everyone else to give their dads a special shout out as well! We’ll be there and so should YOU!!

Be sure to tune and/or log in http://www.bks1radio.com/

Chill in the Chat Room or CALL IN! (646) 233-1302

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Holiday Sales Break

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SYNOPSIS

Just in time for the holiday, FROM FATHERLESS TO FATHERHOOD is a documentary film that explores the causes, effects and possible solutions to father absence in African-American communities. Additionally, the film provides examples of men who are fostering quality relationships with their children, families and therefore, their communities. The film is rooted in the real lives of men, women and children and buttressed by the perspectives of Multi Grammy-Award winning Gospel Recording Artist, Kirk Franklin, Dr. Steve Perry (CNN’s Eduction Contributor), Reverend DeForest B. Soaries (CNN’s Black in America: Almighty Debt) and Jeff Robinson (MBK Entertainment).

FROM FATHERLESS TO FATHERHOOD

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DIRECTOR: Kobie Brown

WRITERS: Kobie Brown, Njeri Brown

PRODUCER: Kobie Brown

CINEMATOGRAPHER: Shawn Peters

EDITORS: Darnell Taylor, Joe Saito

FEATURING: Kirk Franklin, Dr. Steve Perry, Rev. DeForest B. Soaries, DaShaun “Jiwe” Morris, Jeff Robinson, and others

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Watch: Newark’s Own, Dupre’ Kelly, Pushes Literacy and So Can You

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He’s not a schoolteacher, nor has he ever been. But some of life’s most important lessons are taught outside of the classroom, and for Doitall Du, one-third of the legendary Hip Hop trio Lords of The Underground, increasing literacy is one of the most important responsibilities a man carries. We caught up with him during Newark’s 4th Annual 24 Hours of Peace event where he explained why he does so.

DoItAll & 24 Hours of Peace organizer, Hakim Green, on site at reading pop up stand.

DoItAll & 24 Hours of Peace organizer, Hakim Green, on site at reading pop up stand.

I am a product of Newark, NJ, and literacy has always been important to me. Growing up here I was introduced to the same books most kids read by authors like Dr. Suess. My grandmother also used the Bible, specifically the story of the Temptation of Christ –where after being baptized, Jesus fasted for 40 days and was tested – to teach me the importance of patience. That revealed the importance of reading as a teacher of lessons. The most impactful book I read as a kid, however, was 1984 by George Orwell. I was intrigued by its prophecy and vision of what “Big Brother” had planned. Today we’d refer to “Big Brother” as the Illuminati.

Newark had an abundance of Five Percenters, who taught us to see God within ourselves, when I was a teen. One of the principles they taught was the importance of critical thinking instead of accepting things on their face, and with that I always challenged myself to look beyond the surface of any matter. The best way to do that is through reading and asking critical questions.

While I was in college at Shaw University, my passion for music led to my career as one-third of the group, Lords of The Underground.  Like most young artist my focus and immediate concern was, how much money am I going to get paid. Whether they’re in the record business or not there are a lot of people who never actually take the time to read in order to get a full understanding of their surroundings, including the contracts they sign. I discovered a book by Donald Passman called All You Need to Know About the Music Business very early in my career. Reading that book changed my entire outlook and understanding of what being an artist meant because it revealed how the business portion of entertainment worked. Knowing the inner workings of an industry allows you to determine your worth and growth potential beyond just rhyming. It allows you to truly capitalize on your talent. So whether it’s a recording contract, a home loan or a rental agreement, educating yourself is the key to succeeding in anything you get into.

Most people know The Lords, Redman, Naughty By Nature, The Fugees and Queen Latifah are just a few of the artists from Newark and surrounding areas. It’s always been important for each of us to use our success as an example to people from our home towns. In our case, we’ve done this through heavy community engagement ranging from visiting schools to present plays; sponsoring book and coat drives, and giving away turkeys during Thanksgiving. I take giving back very seriously.  A few years ago we connected with Dr. Lauren Wells and Eion Haynes. I’d say we had a nice haircut, and Dr. Wells helped us shape it up by explaining that what we were doing fell into the category of literacy. The result has been 211 Community Impact. One of the activities we’ve been promoting through 211 Community Impact are a number of pop up reading stations throughout the city. We’ve used each event to bring leaders -from former Councilman, now Mayor, Ras Baraka and different Hip Hop legends like KRS One and Ralph McDaniels to connect with citizens through reading.  Another initiative has been to provide adult residents with literature that makes them aware of some of the things happening that will impact their day-to-day lives.  We welcome anyone who takes literacy and our community’s success seriously to participate.

I’m often asked what adults can do to encourage younger people to read. One of the ways I recommend is finding topics young people like and just diving in; reading to them and allowing kids and teens to engage you through reading and discussion. It’s extremely important because just like adults, kids who don’t read well tend to check out and become distracted from learning. Reading and learning give our kids, and therefore our entire community, confidence and the power to succeed rather than a sense of deep insecurity which makes us passive and leaves us feeling completely deflated and defeated. That confidence and knowledge allows young people to see beyond the blocks and city in which they live. It prepares them to succeed. That’s why literacy is important.

Dupree Kelly/ Lord Gang/ 211 Community Impact

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DeVon Franklin Celebrates His Biggest Mentors

Devon Franklin

“The movie of your life is only as successful as the people who you allow to play roles in it” – DeVon Franklin

Uncle Kenny, Papa and David Glover. As you sit with Sony Pictures film executive, Devon Franklin, you’d imagine these to be the names of characters in a script to be developed and possibly green lit. They are not. Instead they are actual people, based many miles away from the flashing lights of tinsel town and the hills of Hollywood, California. Key players in the trajectory of a young man raised, one of three children, all boys, by a single mother in Oakland, California.

Movie Executive, Devon Franklin discusses the role his Uncles & Grandfather played following the death of his Father.

Movie Executive, Devon Franklin discusses the role his Uncles & Grandfather played following the death of his Father.

  Upon entering his office you are greeted by an array of movie posters, awards, magazine covers and a framed picture of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. . On this day Devon Franklin describes the sudden death of his father, and the role that a small group of men played in serving as models of what it meant to be a man. King, who described himself as a drum major for justice, is a fitting presence in the office of Franklin, a drum major for faith of sorts. That faith is described in Franklin’s book, Produced by Faith, released in 2011.

The book analogizes faith in God, combined with action, to the creation and development of a successful movie. As for Devon’s movie; the one that has taken him from Oakland to the highest realms of Hollywood, he takes a moment to share how his mother’s foresight to entrust the examples provided by a small group of men have instilled in him characteristics, lessons and values that he carries everywhere.

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