Manhood

August 4, 2015

A Detective Adopts Two Brothers in Pittsburgh

With no-nonsense haircuts and near-unbreaking stoicism, Pittsburgh police Detective Jack Mook and his two adoptive sons looked like a familyRead more →

June 17, 2015

Fatherhood on The Find A Way to Make A Way Show

On the next episode of The “FIND A WAY to MAKE A WAY” Show, in honor of Fathers Day, HaroldRead more →

June 12, 2015

For One Father, Our Children, and Even Other Fathe …

My name is Matt, and I am the father of three boys and a girl. Education is important to meRead more →

June 8, 2015

A Mother Finds Men Who Are Committed to Youth

Baltimore, MD – Park Heights Section “I brought my niece and my son out to this anti-violence demonstration today soRead more →

June 1, 2015

Join From Fatherless to Fatherhood

As Father’s Day approaches, and on the heels of our recent trip to Baltimore, Maryland, we invite you to enjoyRead more →

June 12, 2014

Our Children, and Even Other Fathers, Watch What W …

My name is Matt, and I am the father of three boys and a girl. Education is important to meRead more →

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A Detective Adopts Two Brothers in Pittsburgh

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With no-nonsense haircuts and near-unbreaking stoicism, Pittsburgh police Detective Jack Mook and his two adoptive sons looked like a family long before a judge made it official on Tuesday.

“You’re Mooks!” the detective told Josh, 15, and Jessee, 11, as they celebrated with high-fives outside the courtroom after the brief hearing before Judge Kathleen Mulligan.

“I have been so very impressed with the wonderful job (Mook) has done,” Mulligan said during the proceeding. Applause broke out when she signed the adoption order.

Mook met the boys about six years ago at Steel City Boxing, where he volunteers as a trainer.

In February 2013 , he stepped in as the boys’ foster father upon learning about their troubled home life with birth parents who struggled with drug addiction. Police had arrested the boys’ guardian.

They’ve been together since.

This summer, the boys fished at Pymatuning State Park and ate their way through Geneva on the Lake, Ohio. When Mook asked Jessee the name of the burrito place, Jessee grinned and said, “Effin Burrito.”

“They loved it,” Mook said.

Outside the hearing room, the boys — wearing collared shirts and dress pants — posed for photos with Mook and relatives. They changed into T-shirts and gym shorts as soon as they got to their Brighton Heights home, and they planned a pizza party at the gym that brought the family together.

“It’s real now. It’s forever,” Mook, 45, said. “Even when they leave the house at 18, I’ll still get headaches.”

Mook said the boys’ birth parents will remain part of their lives.

“I’m still ‘Coach,’ ” Mook said. “Their biological dad is still their dad. I want them to be a part of the good things they experience.”

The boys said they wanted Mook to go through with the adoption. They said they feel healthier. Josh is training for a 10-mile run in November, and Mook said he had to cheer Jessee up with ice cream at the end of last school year because the fifth-grader was upset he got a B and C instead of straight As.

“I’m very happy,” Jessee said. “His house is clean, he has great rules, and I know he’s going to make me a better man in life.”

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Fatherhood on The Find A Way to Make A Way Show

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On the next episode of The “FIND A WAY to MAKE A WAY” Show, in honor of Fathers Day, Harold S. Reed, Jr. dedicates the show to discussing what it is to be a father. The lines will be open for fathers to call in and share their insights and advice and for everyone else to give their dads a special shout out as well! We’ll be there and so should YOU!!

Be sure to tune and/or log in http://www.bks1radio.com/

Chill in the Chat Room or CALL IN! (646) 233-1302

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For One Father, Our Children, and Even Other Fathers, Watch What We Do

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My name is Matt, and I am the father of three boys and a girl.

Education is important to me for my children because life is about maneuvering and navigating through paths that exist, as well as creating those that don’t. Those who educate themselves and gain education from others have the ability to successfully navigate the paths that exist and create ones that don’t. The more you learn and master, the more possibilities you open up for yourself.

School limits us to a miniscule amount of what there is to know. In order to be educated one really must explore, read and watch various media forms, as well as get insight from elders in our communities who have wisdom from their own life experiences to share.

Following the riots I intend to mostly continue on the path I’ve been on. I’ve been an avid supporter of community organizations doing work in Baltimore. I’ve also been pulling fathers and families together in various ways for over a decade. I do plan to work with a few good brothers on a non-profit organization that serves children whose fathers are not in their lives, and fathers who are not in their children’s lives, although I planned to do that before the riots.

Doing these things will ensure that I continually do what I can to give people in Baltimore –both youth and adults– opportunities and resources needed to overcome obstacles that they face in life, and that they have positive male figures to help guide them along the way.

The Fatherhood Collective is my organization. Others doing great work in Baltimore include Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, Save A Dope Boy, Shelly’s Helping Hands, Dream Girls Mentoring and the 300 Men Movement, just to name a few. As it relates to Baltimore and other parts of the world, fathers can improve the trajectory of their children and society by being living examples. Be that which you want others to emulate. Our children, and even other fathers, watch what we do.

 

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A Mother Finds Men Who Are Committed to Youth

Jasmine

Baltimore, MD – Park Heights Section

“I brought my niece and my son out to this anti-violence demonstration today so they could see we are strongest when we are united. Most of all I want my four year old son to see older men who are committed to younger people, and defy many stereotypes. It’s good to know there are men who can provide an example of what my son can grow to be.” – Jasmine

 

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Join From Fatherless to Fatherhood

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As Father’s Day approaches, and on the heels of our recent trip to Baltimore, Maryland, we invite you to enjoy our photo series that explores manhood, fatherhood and community. Be sure to tell us what authentic fatherhood means and looks like to you, as well as sharing your thoughts with those who matter the most to you.

We’re also making our award-winning film, FROM FATHERLESS TO FATHERHOOD, available for free streaming. It’s a great gift to purchase or share with anyone you believe will benefit from it.

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Our Children, and Even Other Fathers, Watch What We Do

IMG_6386

My name is Matt, and I am the father of three boys and a girl.

Education is important to me for my children because life is about maneuvering and navigating through paths that exist, as well as creating those that don’t. Those who educate themselves and gain education from others have the ability to successfully navigate the paths that exist and create ones that don’t.  The more you learn and master, the more possibilities you open up for yourself.

School limits us to a miniscule amount of what there is to know. In order to be educated one really must explore, read and watch various media forms, as well as get insight from elders in our communities who have wisdom from their own life experiences to share.

Following the riots I intend to mostly continue on the path I’ve been on. I’ve been an avid supporter of community organizations doing work in Baltimore. I’ve also been pulling fathers and families together in various ways for over a decade. I do plan to work with a few good brothers on a non-profit organization that serves children whose fathers are not in their lives, and fathers who are not in their children’s lives, although I planned to do that before the riots.

Doing these things will ensure that I continually do what I can to give people in Baltimore –both youth and adults– opportunities and resources needed to overcome obstacles that they face in life, and that they have positive male figures to help guide them along the way.

The Fatherhood Collective is my organization. Others doing great work in Baltimore include Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, Save A Dope Boy, Shelly’s Helping Hands, Dream Girls Mentoring and the 300 Men Movement, just to name a few. As it relates to Baltimore and other parts of the world, fathers can improve the trajectory of their children and society by being living examples. Be that which you want others to emulate. Our children, and even other fathers, watch what we do.

 

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