fathers

February 12, 2016

Pastor Terrance Taylor & Daughters Thank You …

June 5, 2015

Baltimore’s Jewels: Manhood, Fatherhood  …

  jewel [joo–uh l] noun a person or thing that is treasured, esteemed, or indispensable. As Father’s Day approaches weRead more →

May 28, 2015

She’s Back. Say Hello to Riley Curry!

After sharing an adorable moment with his daughter following the Warriors’ Western Finals-clinching victory against the Rockets on Wednesday night, StephenRead more →

October 20, 2014

“Be A Role Model to My Son, and I’ll B …

Tag a friend who doesn’t know about FROM FATHERLESS TO FATHERHOOD . See more by visiting the link in ourRead more →

October 10, 2014

October 10th Happy Friday, Fathers

The Central Park Five’s, Yusef Salaam, holds the youngest of his children at 24 Hours of Peace in Newark, NJ.Read more →

September 24, 2014

Black-ish or Black: Fathers Raising Black Kids in …

Today’s en vogue language concerning a person’s lived experiences involves the master narrative, or commonly understood ways of being.  AndRead more →

June 12, 2014

Our Children, and Even Other Fathers, Watch What W …

My name is Matt, and I am the father of three boys and a girl. Education is important to meRead more →

June 2, 2014

Baseball and Family are Team Sports

Some call him coach, but four young men call him dad. As seen at The Urban Daily, Brian Phillips explains whyRead more →

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Pastor Terrance Taylor & Daughters Thank You for Being a Friend.

A father and his daughters give musical thanks to his congregation. Check out this special rendition of Andrew Gold’ s “Thank You For Being a Friend”, the song popularized by the televisions show, The Golden Girls.

Check it out and share your thoughts.

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Baltimore’s Jewels: Manhood, Fatherhood & Community

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jewel

[joouh l]
noun
a person or thing that is treasured, esteemed, or indispensable.

As Father’s Day approaches we take a look at every day men and women from Baltimore, Maryland as they reflect on topics of manhood, fatherhood and the strengthening of their community; all on the heels of riots growing out of the murder of Baltimore citizen, Freddie Gray, by local police. Collectively, the wisdom they share and efforts they make to advance their community are nothing short of indispensable.

We hope that you’ll contribute and share.

We’re exploring Manhood, Fatherhood & Community because June 21st is #FathersDay #Baltimore

A video posted by TOFATHERHOOD (@tofatherhood) on

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She’s Back. Say Hello to Riley Curry!

Riley Curry

After sharing an adorable moment with his daughter following the Warriors’ Western Finals-clinching victory against the Rockets on Wednesday night, Stephen Curry again had his lovable little two-year-old steal the show in the postgame press conference.

Riley Curry burst onto the scene in Game 1’s press conference, sparking a mini controversy amongst irritated reporters fighting tight deadlines and wanting the NBA MVP’s full attention.

In this press conference, Curry answered tough questions from the media. His daughter, meanwhile, took precedence with some incredibly hilarious distractions which included playing peek-a-boo behind a curtain and handing her gum to a Warriors employee.

“She’s taking advantage of the situation for sure,” Curry said at the mic.

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October 10th Happy Friday, Fathers

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The Central Park Five’s, Yusef Salaam, holds the youngest of his children at 24 Hours of Peace in Newark, NJ.

Welcome! Click the FROM FATHERLESS TO FATHERHOOD logo below to enter the PARENTING section of our site, and don’t forget to subscribe to our monthly newsletter below.

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Black-ish or Black: Fathers Raising Black Kids in the Suburbs and Beyond

Father & Role Model
A father of three sons, Malaney Hill reflects on what it means to raise black boys in a suburban setting.

A father of three sons, Malaney Hill reflects on what it means to raise black boys in a suburban setting.

Today’s en vogue language concerning a person’s lived experiences involves the master narrative, or commonly understood ways of being.  And for Black folk, Black men and boys in particular, there is a default understanding of us as being bound within an urban narrative.  Certainly, mainstream music and moving images celebrate the hard-scrabbled city life that Black boys and Black men are assumed to grow up in.  It is romantic to many, the idea of wrestling the cityscape to achieve against the odds. It is largely a myth, however, insomuch as the lived experiences of Black people is diverse and increasingly involves a pronounced class that lives in suburban areas.

These suburban areas, in turn, are diverse and place unique demands on the psyche of Black people.  W.E.B. Du Bois historically explained the pull of Black folk having to attend to a mainstream and to a Black cultural experience.  While Black identity pioneer William Cross described the behavioral adaptation to this polarity through code switching between the two realities articulated by Du Bois.

The puzzle is not a new one then, how to navigate a Black cultural experience and one that is more broadly explained as “American” without losing self in the process.  The key is found in realizing that our self, our identities are both uniquely Black and typically American. Indeed – to paraphrase Langston Hughes – we, too, sing America.

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And grasping this reality gives us permission, in many ways, to be more Black by filling our self with experiences that are beyond the arrested development that many assume we need to attach ourselves to.  It is important for us to be in settings that are not “typically” Black or urban, because it helps to grow the understanding of what and how Black Americans are – we are more than that master narrative.  Our identities are made robust by exposure.

So then, fathers have the responsibility to present more to their sons than the expectations of Black masculinity that are found in the city story.  This is done carefully by qualifying suburban schooling, trips to the lake, golfing, lacrosse and that summer jaunt to Ethiopia as components of Black liberation.  Though it might sound like a bit of a stretch, having Black bodies occupy these spaces pushes us into healthy living beyond the margins.  Thinking and doing in this way eradicates the foolish notion of being smart and accomplished as being “white” by connecting Black identification to a world culture that is in service to Black people in urban and suburban areas alike.

No doubt, this is easier said than done.  But this is living, and we have a right and responsibility to push against the sensibilities of racism that suggest we belong elsewhere than everywhere.

 

 

 

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Our Children, and Even Other Fathers, Watch What We Do

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My name is Matt, and I am the father of three boys and a girl.

Education is important to me for my children because life is about maneuvering and navigating through paths that exist, as well as creating those that don’t. Those who educate themselves and gain education from others have the ability to successfully navigate the paths that exist and create ones that don’t.  The more you learn and master, the more possibilities you open up for yourself.

School limits us to a miniscule amount of what there is to know. In order to be educated one really must explore, read and watch various media forms, as well as get insight from elders in our communities who have wisdom from their own life experiences to share.

Following the riots I intend to mostly continue on the path I’ve been on. I’ve been an avid supporter of community organizations doing work in Baltimore. I’ve also been pulling fathers and families together in various ways for over a decade. I do plan to work with a few good brothers on a non-profit organization that serves children whose fathers are not in their lives, and fathers who are not in their children’s lives, although I planned to do that before the riots.

Doing these things will ensure that I continually do what I can to give people in Baltimore –both youth and adults– opportunities and resources needed to overcome obstacles that they face in life, and that they have positive male figures to help guide them along the way.

The Fatherhood Collective is my organization. Others doing great work in Baltimore include Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, Save A Dope Boy, Shelly’s Helping Hands, Dream Girls Mentoring and the 300 Men Movement, just to name a few. As it relates to Baltimore and other parts of the world, fathers can improve the trajectory of their children and society by being living examples. Be that which you want others to emulate. Our children, and even other fathers, watch what we do.

 

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Baseball and Family are Team Sports

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Some call him coach, but four young men call him dad. As seen at The Urban DailyBrian Phillips explains why baseball, like family, is a team sport. When asked the values he finds most important to instill, Brian proudly proclaimed, “As a father the three most important things I try to instill in my children are discipline, respect and honesty.” To Brian they are “the core values of what a man should be.”

 

Watch the video here:

Stream From Fatherless to Fatherhood here:

FROM FATHERLESS TO FATHERHOOD – Trailer from The Kobie Chronicles. on Vimeo.

 

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